ICD-10-CM M99.01 Diagnosis Code Usage

Touseef Riaz

February 28, 2022

ICD-10-CM M99.01 Diagnosis Code Usage

The year 2022 ICD-10-CM (International Classification of Diseases – Clinical Modification) diagnosis code for Segmental and Somatic dysfunction of the cervical region is M99.01. Before diving into the details of this specific or billable ICD 10 code, let’s take a look at what Somatic Dysfunction of the Cervical Region is.

Diagnosis Code M99.01 ICD-10-CM:

The M99.01 diagnosis code is an ICD-10-CM billable or specific code, meaning it can be used for reimbursement purposes, indicating the diagnosis. M99.01 is America’s ICD-10-CM code. The ICD-10 M99.01 code for other countries may differ.

The 2022 edition of the ICD-10-CM code for Segmental and Somatic Dysfunction of the Cervical Region has been effective since October 1st, 2021. The diagnosis code, M99.01, is a subcategory code originating from chapter 13 of the ICD-10-CM coding manual: Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System and Connective Tissue, ranging from M00 to M99. The M99.01 diagnosis code for segmental and somatic dysfunction of the cervical region originates from M99; the ICD-10-CM code for Biomechanical Lesions, Not elsewhere classified. This is a non-billable or non-specific code as it contains multiple codes underneath providing a wide range of detail.

Approximate synonyms for the M99.01 ICD-10-CM code:

Following is the list of approximate synonyms of the ICD 10 code M99.01 diagnosis code:

  • Cervical Somatic Dysfunctions
  • Dysfunction of the Cervicothoracic region
  • Segmental Dysfunction of the Cervical Region
  • Somatic Dysfunction of the Cervical (neck) Region
  • Cervicothoracic segmental dysfunction

ICD-10-CM M99.01 Diagnosis Code Usage

The Anatomy of Cervical Spine:

The cervical spine is the neck part of the spinal cord; it comprises about seven vertebrae ranging from C1 to C7, beginning from the skull with the bottom connecting to the thoracic spine (upper back). The major role of the cervical spine is to provide/allow the neck with flexibility and the skull or head with a range of motion.

What is Somatic and Segmental Dysfunction?

Segmental dysfunction of the spine can occur at any point, including the cervical spine, lumbar spine, or thoracic spine; neck region, lower back, and the mid-back, respectively. It is basically the mechanical issues related to the vertebral joints (also known as facet joints), muscles, and ligaments of the spine. The movement of our spine depends highly on these joints. Poor posture, any physical trauma, or certain movements can also cause segmental dysfunction (functional impairment) of the spine. Any altered function in the somatic region, i.e., the musculoskeletal, lymphatic, or nervous system – is the somatic dysfunction. The somatic and segmental dysfunction of the cervical spine can affect the normal functionality of the region. This terminology is used for a number of injuries to the joints (facet joints) associated with the cervical spine.

What are the signs and symptoms of this functional impairment?

As the spinal cord is a human’s central support system, any issue with it can lead to a number of problems while performing daily activities. Some of the common signs and symptoms of somatic and segmental dysfunction of the cervical spine include the following:

  • Limited range of motion or movement
  • Muscle spasms in the affected area (in case of the cervical region, the neck)
  • Sharp pain
  • Numbness and tingling sensation
  • Trigger points

What are the common causes of somatic and segmental cervical dysfunction?

Common causes or reasons behind somatic dysfunction of the cervical spine are often the poor postures of the neck or back. Somatic dysfunction also commonly occurs due to a fall or slip resulting in certain sudden movements and an accident.

Treating this Spinal dysfunction:

Right after the somatic and segmental dysfunction of the cervical spine is diagnosed, the healthcare physician might begin with manual physical manipulation of the cervical region affected via trigger point releases. A physical therapist or a chiropractor often performs this manual therapy.

Depending on the condition of the patient, healthcare physicians may as well prescribe anti-inflammatory medications advising short courses.

What are Diagnosis codes?

These are alphanumeric codes (ICD-10) representing a specific medical condition, disease, or diagnosis. The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is a coding system used for just that. These codes help in documenting and reporting a patient’s medical record based on the physician’s diagnosis of the patient by the medical billers.

ICD-10-CM (Clinical Modification) is the 10th revision of this coding system and involves the standard classification of the diagnosis codes. These codes represent the findings, medical conditions and diseases, signs, symptoms, and any other related health problems (injuries, etc.).

ICD 10 Coding System:

ICD-10 coding system is published or authorized by the World Health Organization (WHO) and has been implemented since October 1st, 2015. These codes are updated every year. ICD-10 is the tenth revision of this coding system and comprises two medical code sets:

  • ICD-10-CM (Clinical Modification – Diagnosis Codes)
  • ICD-10-PCS (Procedure Coding System – Procedure Codes)

What is the difference between ICD-10-CM & PCS codes?

ICD-10-CM coding manual consists of diagnosis codes for all healthcare settings, whereas the ICD-10-PCS coding manual only consists of procedure codes for hospital inpatient settings.

The ICD-10 coding manual provides more detail and specificity to the patient’s medical condition than the ICD-9 coding manual. The ICD-10 codes are now being used for a wide range of purposes, including:

  • Monitoring and measuring the quality of patient care
  • For medical billing and coding; reimbursement purposes
  • Monitoring the provider’s performance has been improved.

The 10th revision of the ICD coding manual consists of codes with 3 to 7 characters (alphabets and digits) starting with an alphabet. For instance, the 2022 ICD-10-CM diagnosis code for segmental and somatic dysfunction of the cervical region is M99.01.

Errors associated with using the ICD-10 coding manual:

There are a number of coding mistakes associated with using the ICD-10 coding manual. Some of the most common coding mistakes include:

  • Using the old or outdated diagnosis or procedure codes:

ICD-10 codes are updated every year. Using outdated or old codes is one of the most common coding errors. It happens because the medical billers or coders are more familiar with the ICD-9 coding manual. Note that using the wrong or outdated code can lead to claim denials and issues with reimbursement.

  • Forgetting the procedure code

Including all the required details into the claim is essential which means using all the important diagnosis codes as well as the procedure codes. Incomplete or missing information can lead to a loss in revenues and a lower reimbursement rate.

  • Confusion between similar digits and alphabets

Human errors like confusing a 0 (digit) with an O (alphabet) are also another common coding error.  They may seem minor but can lead to denials and lost revenues.

How to avoid errors in ICD-10 coding?

The errors in medical coding can be avoided by paying attention to the details and making sure that the complete and correct documentation of the patients’ medical records is available. Always double-check for the patient information and verify the codes being used.

ICD-10 coding manual consists of codes with multiple subcategories. For instance, the M99 code for Biomechanical Lesions, Not elsewhere classified, is a non-billable or non-specific code. Make sure that only the billable or specific codes like M99.01 are being used.

Following the ICD-10 coding manual guidelines is essential for avoiding any errors in documentation.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is the 01 diagnosis code?

M99.01 is the 2022 edition of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code for Segmental and Somatic Dysfunction of the Cervical Region. The M99.01 itself is a billable OR specific code meaning it can be used for reimbursement purposes by indicating the diagnosis. This code falls under Chapter 13: Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System and Connective Tissue (ranging from M00 to M99) of the ICD-10-CM coding manual.

What is coding and billing in the 01 diagnosis code?

M99.01 is a billable/specific code, meaning it provides enough detail that it can be used to specify a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes. The M99.01 is an ICD-10-CM diagnosis code for the Segmental and Somatic Dysfunction of the Cervical Region. ICD-10 is a code set authorized by the World Health Organization (WHO) and contains about over 70,000 codes. These codes are updated every year.

What does the 01 diagnosis code do?

M99.01 ICD-10-CM diagnosis code is used to report a segmental and somatic dysfunction of the cervical region. The 2022 edition of this code has been effective since October 1st, 2021, and will remain active till September 30th, 2022. M99.01 is the American ICD-10-CM version of this code and it may vary for other countries.

What are some of the most common M99.01 diagnosis code errors?

There are a number of errors or mistakes associated when coding with the ICD-10-CM (Clinical Modification) coding manual. One of the most common mistakes is using outdated ICD codes, as medical billers and coders are more familiar with the ICD-9 coding system. Other common coding errors include:

  • Not specifying or forgetting the procedure codes or diagnosis codes
  • Confusion between the letters or alphabets, e.g., 0 (digit) and O (alphabet).

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